David Stern says NBA flopping penalties are too weak

June 7, 2013 – 12:03 am by Ryan Phillips

David Stern

NBA commissioner David Stern said Thursday that the NBA’s penalties for flopping are far too weak and aren’t enough to stop players from doing it. He then claimed he wasn’t sure if the league would do anything to strengthen its rules against the practice.

This season the NBA implemented a system to crack down on flopping. Players were fined $5,000 for a second offense during the regular season and $5,000 for a first offense in the playoffs. Players only received a warning for first offenses during the regular season.

Stern had the following to say about the flopping penalties:

“It isn’t enough. You’re not going to cause somebody to stop it for $5,000 when the average player’s salary is $5.5 million. And anyone who thought that was going to happen was allowing hope to prevail over reason.”

The commissioner, who will step down from his post on February 1, 2014, continued:

“We knew that flopping was going to be far from perfect. And we gather more attention because we were giving it more attention. But the point was to do it gently, look at all the flops – and there have been plenty – penalize the most egregious very gently.

“We could end that immediately if we decided to suspend players, but that might be a little bit draconian at the moment.”

Stern also said the NBA’s Board of Governors and Competition Committee will have further discussions about how to handle flopping before next season.

During the 2012-13 season there were 19 warnings for first offenses issued and five players were fined after the league determined they had flopped a second time. So far in the postseason six players have been fined.

The NBA certainly does have a flopping problem and Stern is right to be concerned about it. A $5,000 fine is not enough of a deterrent to get guys to stop, especially when the practice can be an effective way to draw fouls.

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  1. 7 Responses to “David Stern says NBA flopping penalties are too weak”

  2. No sh** sherlock! Stern fines the Spurs 250 grand because they sat three key players in a game he felt they should have played in. Siting the importance of giving the fans what they pay hard earned money to see doesn’t apply in this situation? It most certainly does!!! Rasheed Wallace called out the league a few years back and said it was becoming the WWF. He was right! Isn’t that ripping off the fans? I pay to watch real basketball. The league is so watered down now and sadly lacks the respect it once deserved. Players who defend the flops see it as doing whats necessary to win the game. Really? I thought real talent was what won the game. Professional athletes acting like clowns!! I miss the sport.

    By TwistedSister on Jun 7, 2013

  3. I have the perfect solution. The flop is designed to draw a foul? well, give the foul to the team that flopped. loosing the possession or a couple points should put a stop to it!I also agree with TwisstedSister. The game has gone to Sh– the way the refs let them throw each other around.

    By John on Jun 19, 2013

  4. It’s over, and has been over. The former NBA that we have all known, and grown to love has changed dramatically. The most raw talented person to fuel the NBA has sold out on multiple levels. Lebron James, Oh I don’t blame him for leaving Cleveland, because after all, after numerous seasons at one place, the decision makers didn’t get him much help over the course of his play while there. But true superstars take what they have and make it work, they take average players and make them better, apparently he is unable to do this. But there was a time that what he did in meeting up and creating the big 3 in south beach would have been never happened by those that are making the decisions for the NBA. A decision that was obviously fueled by money. Good job Stern. The sooner you are gone, the better off the NBA will be in trying to repair the damage that you have done to a once great game.

    Another reason why Lebron has let us down, is because all that I have mentioned already could have been diverted to some degree if he hadn’t sold out. Sold out on multiple levels. Him being the future of the NBA with all his raw natural given ability, he could have seriously impacted the game on a larger scale. And what I mean by this is that the former greats of the game would have never, NEVER have done what he obviously guilty of, and that is guilty of flopping. Are you kidding me? This is why I will stop watching this game, especially once the older greats are done playing and retire, the Tim Duncan’s, and so forth, because after these guys are done playing, then this present direction of the NBA can fully embrace their target destination, and become some sort of ill perceived version of the WWF of basketball. All that he will do in my honest opinion will have asterisks by it, but that again, …hey it is my view personally, but it is the truth too.

    By djack2112 on Jun 19, 2013

  5. I agree with the solution posted by djack2112 but I think one of the game biggest flaws is the lack of gutsy referees that would call the game by the rules disregard of the time remaining. Too many games lost within the two final minutes. One in case, game six of the final. Obviously the call should have been a walk or a foul but not a no-call. Three referees looking at the same game and not one made a call. If I were to bet on these games, I would have put my money on the Heat on game six, not because I trusted in their abilities but as I told some Heat fans, the referees will always find a way to let them back in the game. I understand that, being human, they will not make all the right calls but I don’t see any effort on the part of the NBA Commissioner to make this situation any better. It has gotten to the point where you can expect the “no-foul-call” at the final minutes of the game. If referees are not going to make the calls because the game is within its final two minutes, then the NBA should make it a rule that in the last two minutes no foul will be called. Rules should independent of time. A foul is a foul and a turn-over is a turn-over. They are violations to the game as long as the official game clock has not expired and they are to be called.

    I perceived the NBA and the so-called basketball media experts who are looking for that next super star, “Michael Jordan”, in King James are too much of an influence on the referees and the NBA Commissioner. Could this be why the bad calls by the refs are not addressed? In every modern sport: soccer, hockey, football, baseball, tennis the referees are exposed for their bad calls. This is what makes them accountable even when the game is already over. This brings some credibility to the sport in the eyes of the fans. But not in the NBA where the refs are clouded even by the media which allows for the behavior to continue and even worsen to the detriment of the sport and the credibility of the lovers of the sport. Furthermore, it is time for the NBA to introduce some younger refs that can keep up with the speed of these extremely fast athletes; that can see very well the action going on the court, although most of time it’s not for lack of seeing the plays that the calls are not made, but lack of willingness; and lastly but vital, the very willingness to make the rules stand by making the tough calls with the clock running out, even to the last second remaining.

    By Mario on Jun 19, 2013

  6. I agree with the solution posted by djack2112 but I think one of the game biggest flaws is the lack of gutsy referees that would call the game by the rules disregard of the time remaining. Too many games lost within the two final minutes. One in case, game six of the final. Obviously the call should have been a walk or a foul but not a no-call. Three referees looking at the same game and not one made a call. If I were to bet on these games, I would have put my money on the Heat on game six, not because I trusted in their abilities but as I told some Heat fans, the referees will always find a way to let them back in the game. I understand that, being human, they will not make all the right calls but I don’t see any effort on the part of the NBA Commissioner to make this situation any better. It has gotten to the point where you can expect the “no-foul-call” at the final minutes of the game. If referees are not going to make the calls because the game is within its final two minutes, then the NBA should make it a rule that in the last two minutes no foul will be called. Rules should independent of time. A foul is a foul and a turn-over is a turn-over. They are violations to the game as long as the official game clock has not expired and they are to be called.

    I perceived the NBA and the so-called basketball media experts who are looking for that next super star, “Michael Jordan”, in King James are too much of an influence on the referees and the NBA Commissioner. Could this be why the bad calls by the refs are not addressed? In every modern sport: soccer, hockey, football, baseball, tennis the referees are exposed for their bad calls. This is what makes them accountable even when the game is already over. This brings some credibility to the sport in the eyes of the fans. But not in the NBA where the refs are clouded even by the media which allows for the behavior to continue and even worsen to the detriment of the sport and the credibility of the lovers of the sport. Furthermore, it is time for the NBA to introduce some younger refs that can keep up with the speed of these extremely fast athletes; that can see very well the action going on the court, although most of time it’s not for lack of seeing the plays that the calls are not made, but lack of willingness; and lastly but vital, the very willingness to make the rules stand by making the tough calls with the clock running out, even to the last second remaining.

    By Mario on Jun 19, 2013

  7. I totally agree with all posts I recently had a conversation with my nephew on old time basketball and how the great players really were great. They did not flop for a foul which consequently can turn the game around. He disagrees with me due to the fact he is a Bryant and LeBron fan.

    By veronica on Jun 20, 2013

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